Where theory
meets practice

Top litigators in The Academy complement the Basel Institute's work to tackle financial crime. These litigators are creative and eager to explore innovative strategies.
Political Scientist Gretta Fenner
Managing Director of the Basel Institute on Governance
Working alongside the academics at The Academy, we see organic growth, improved litigation and research skills, and are challenged daily to closely examine stimulating issues.
Litigator Keith Oliver
Head of International, Peters & Peters
The Basel Institute encourages prosecution agencies to engage The Academy's litigators to represent them in foreign courts against financial institutions facing money laundering and corruption.
Professor Mark Pieth
Member of the Foundation Board
of the Basel Institute on Governance
We're learning that more regulations mean more regulations to break, leading to more prosecutions and litigation for both poachers and gamekeepers.
Litigator Keith Oliver
Head of International, Peters & Peters

Educate

Offering continuing education for litigators and researchers.

Collect

Maintaining financial crimes database generated by the courts, law enforcement and legal professionals worldwide.

The International Academy of Financial Crime Litigators emerged from a vision to develop worldwide collaborative solutions that are based on research, collective experiences and best practices in cases of economic crime.

The Academy has united the top public- and private-sector litigation professionals with the renowned Basel Institute on Governance and like-minded academics to form an independent, non-partisan global center of excellence that encourages collaboration and innovation to shape and advance financial-crime litigation practices for the future.
Basel Institute on Governance

Founder's quotes

Stephane Bonifassi

“Considering the growth of the worldwide white-collar criminal practice, we saw a need to bring together hardcore litigators to foster skills and allow court access when the case needs to be decided there.”

— Stéphane Bonifassi

“A foundation for maintaining the rule of law is a strong and independent bar. The Academy ‎will seek to foster our strength and independence through collegiality, nonpartisanship, inclusiveness, internationalism and learning.”

— Lincoln Caylor

Lincoln Caylor
Elizabeth Ortega

“The Academy is about bringing together A-list financial crime litigators and renowned academics to whet curiosity, sharpen techniques and provide the leadership that will mold and enhance the professional landscape.”

— Elizabeth Ortega

Members in the news

Saturday, March 09, 2019

‘Money’s Corrupting Influence’ on Governments’ Application of International Law

In his commentary for SWI swissinfo.ch, Mark Pieth looks at Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s influence on his Minister of Justice to strike a deal with engineering company SNC-Lavalin instead of taking it to court over bribery allegations, stemming from dealings with Libya. Pieth compares this to Tony Blair’s similar action in the UK with British Aerospace’s alleged bribery of Saudi Arabia’s government officials.

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Thursday, March 07, 2019

Canadian Corporate Criminal Liability

Writing for New York University School of Law’s “Compliance & Enforcement” blog, Lincoln Caylor examines how Canada’s Corporate Liability Doctrine has been historically applied, following a narrow scope that names employees or individuals involved in the wrongdoing rather than the corporations themselves.

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Blogs of Interest

Compliance and Enforcement
A blog sponsored by NYU Law's Program on Corporate Compliance and Enforcement, edited by Jennifer Arlen.

IELR Blog
The official blog of the "International Enforcement Law Reporter," edited by Bruce Zagaris.

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Lincoln Caylor Explains to GIR How Lack of Investigators Delays Trials, Threaten Justice in Canada

Lincoln Caylor explains how a lack of investigators for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police puts cases at odds with a Supreme Court ruling that mandates the time between charges and the end of a trial should not exceed 30 months.

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